SP 4.1 Early warning systems in public health

 Wednesday 11 May, 08.45 – 10.30, Leeuwen Room I

Early warning systems, based on climatic and environmental conditions, can help improve and accelerate alert and public health response capabilities and provide the evidence-base for strategic public health action. Such systems can significantly enhance preparedness to emerging infectious diseases, thereby helping contain human and economic costs, particularly in resource-strapped regions. Monitoring long-term trends in order to build systems adapted to global climate change, and not just meteorological conditions, remains a challenge for public health practitioners. A number of early warning systems from around the world will be presented at this session.

Organised by Jan C. Semenza, European Centre for Disease Prevention Control (ECDC), Sweden
Kristie Ebi, University of Washington, USA
Chair Jan C. Semenza, European Centre for Disease Prevention Control (ECDC), Sweden
Rapporteur Kristie Ebi, University of Washington, USA
Presentations

Malaria early warning systems: experience from South Africa
Swadhin Behera, Application Laboratory, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama, Japan

Infectious disease early warning systems: experience from ECDC
Jan C. Semenza, European Centre for Disease Prevention Control (ECDC), Sweden

Lyme disease early warning systems: experience and lessons from Canada
Nick H. Ogden, Public Health Agency, Canada

Dengue early warning systems in Asia
Joacim Rocklov, University of Umea, Sweden

Climate change: addressing heat-health vulnerability in rapidly urbanising regions of Western India
Priya Dutta and Abhiyant Tiwari, Indian Institute of Public Health, India

Using seasonal forecasts to drive infectious diseases early warning systems, and a bit beyond
Andy Morse, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom

HOSTS OF THE CONFERENCE